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Cut-Away V-2 Engine

In addition to their stock V-2 engine, the Air Force Museum also has a cut-away V-2 engine. This cut-away allows the visitor to follow the flow of fuel, through the double-walled combustion chamber, into the burner cups, and finally into the combustion chamber where it mixes with LOX to actual burn.

What turned out to be the final design of the V-2 engine, with its 18 burner cups, was intended by its designers to be only an interim design. They had intended to use a flat-face injector, but the schedule of war dictated a design freeze before they were able to achieve stable combustion with the injector. Nearly all post-war engines used a flat-face injector, but many encountered the problem of combustion instability. Many of these engines solved their combustion instability problems by employing the use of injector baffles on the injector face, compartmentalizing the injector face in a manner reminiscent of the burner cups.

The Air Force Museum also has a cut-away V-2 engine turbopump. The Udvar-Hazy Center also has a cut-away V-2 engine turbopump and cut-away V-2 engine.

I have a number of resources regarding the V-2 engine and the V-2 missile.

 
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